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Editorials

I often talk about encouraging “diversity” in our forests. The reaction of most people is that they want their forest to be diverse, but they …

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As someone who loves forests, one of the hardest and strangest parts of my job is to figure out how to cut trees in a way that supports the he…

Editorials
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Many of us have had the experience of walking through the woods, when suddenly the raucous sounds and green-tinted light of a deciduous forest…

By ETHAN TAPPER On my property in Bolton, I am engaged in a long-term management regime to regenerate and encourage northern red oak (Quercus rubra; henceforth called “red oak”). My thin-soiled, south-facing land provides what a forester or logger might call “oak ground,” an area well-suited to the growth of this species. About 20 years […]

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By ETHAN TAPPER If you research early logging practices in New England, you’ll find a lot of amazing stories. In the times before the chainsaw and the skidder, loggers headed into the woods for the winter with draft horses, crosscut saws and double-bit axes and drove the logs down the rivers in the spring. In […]

Once the leaves have fallen, you might notice a “green haze” in the understory of our forests. This time of year is a great chance to notice where invasive exotic plants, which often hold onto their leaves longer than our native species, are located. In Chittenden County, invasive exotic plants are present on most properties, […]

My woodlot in Bolton was logged in the 1980s. Through a practice known as “diameter-limit cutting,” all trees above a certain diameter (probably 11 or 14 inches) were cut. My land is a good site for growing red and white oak, white and red pine, red spruce and hemlock, but this harvest removed most trees […]

If you live in Vermont, chances are that you live near a town forest. Whether they are called a “Town Forest,” “Natural Area,” “Country Park,” “Conservation Area,” “Community Forest,” or “Municipal Forest,” town forests can be simply defined as a primarily forested property owned by a municipality. In Chittenden County we have about a dozen […]