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Essex Gives Back

ECP present donation to Women Helping Battered Women

On Jan. 30, Essex Community Players presented a donation to the organization Women Helping Battered Women of Burlington. The check for $816.80 represented the donations collected by ECP during the two-week run of their fall musical “The Spitfire Grill”. Through its “Essex Gives Back” program, ECP gives its patrons the opportunity to make donations to a local charitable organization. WHBW was chosen in this instance because it was felt their mission fit well with the show’s themes, which include women overcoming abusive situations. WHBW helped nearly 5,000 people in 2014 through such services as emergency shelter, transitional housing, economic and legal advocacy, emotional support and education. Producer Dick Hibbert and Music Director Connie Cooney McDonald presented the check to Executive Director Kelly Dougherty and the staff of WHBW.

Essex Community Players presents a $816.80 check to Women Helping Battered Women of Burlington on Jan. 30. The funds were raised through the Essex Gives Back program during ticket sales for “The Spitfire Grill”. Pictured from left to right: Janice Santiago, Community Engagement Specialist at WHBW; Kelly Dougherty, Executive Director at WHBW; Constance McDonald, Music Director for “The Spitfire Grill”; and Anna Niemiec, Board Chair at WHBW. PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

Essex Community Players presents a $816.80 check to Women Helping Battered Women of Burlington on Jan. 30. The funds were raised through the Essex Gives Back program during ticket sales for “The Spitfire Grill”. Pictured from left to right: Janice Santiago, Community Engagement Specialist at WHBW; Kelly Dougherty, Executive Director at WHBW; Constance McDonald, Music Director for “The Spitfire Grill”; and Anna Niemiec, Board Chair at WHBW.
PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

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Cozy quinzhees

From left to right: sixth-graders Souma Mitra, Deegan Phillips, Addie Boutin, Megan Ginnett and Gloria Holmes sit inside their “Dakota Survival Shelter” or quinzhee outside of Albert D. Lawton Intermediate School on Feb. 12. PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

From left to right: sixth-graders Souma Mitra, Deegan Phillips, Addie Boutin, Megan Ginnett and Gloria Holmes sit inside their “Dakota Survival Shelter” or quinzhee outside of Albert D. Lawton Intermediate School on Feb. 12.
PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

Every January and February the grade 6 students at the Albert D. Lawton School take part in an interdisciplinary unit of study on Lands of the Polar Regions. In math, science, language arts and social studies classes, students study subjects such things survival skills, global warming, natural resources, wind chill temperatures, occupations, geography, economics, tall tales and more. As part of the sixth graders’ studies they are placed on teams of five or six and head outside to make igloos — known more formally as Dakota Survival Shelters or quinzhees.

In order to make a quinzhee, students spend up to an hour and a half working in the snow. First they measure out a large 15-foot circle. Then they pile snow roughly six feet high in the middle as evenly as possible. Then the students use 8-10 foot-long sticks that they push into the dome of snow. Next the students hollow out the quinzhee. When they can see the bottom of the sticks they do not hollow out any higher. This way the entire quinzhee has an even base of snow thoughout its structure and will last for many days outside. Lastly the student-teams crawl inside their quinzhees and place their team flags on top.